CSB

Stanford School of Medicine

Chemical & Systems Biology

 

Courses

The Department of Chemical and Systems Biology offers several graduate courses that span cell biology, chemical biology, systems biology, and drug discovery. Our students also draw on a wide array of courses offered by other departments and programs.

Information about additional courses can be obtained from the Stanford University Bulletin.


Biosciences Interdisciplinary 200: Foundations in Experimental Biology

(Offered 2016-2017 and typically every year: Fall Quarter : 5 units)

This course is divided into two 3-week cycles. During the first cycle, students will be developing a 2-page original research proposal, which may be used for NSF or other fellowship applications. In the second cycle, students will work in small teams and will be mentored by faculty to develop an original research project for oral presentation. Skills emphasized include: 1) reading for breadth and depth; 2) developing compelling, creative arguments; 3) communicating with the spoken and written word; 4) working in teams. Important features of the course include peer assessment, interactive joint classes, and substantial face-to-face discussion with faculty drawn from across the Biosciences programs. Shortened autumn quarter class; class meets during weeks 1 through 8 of the quarter.

Instructor: Biosciences Faculty


Biosciences Interdisciplinary 204: Practical Tutorial on the Modeling of Signal Transduction Motifs

(Offered 2016-2017and typically every year: Spring Quarter : 2 units)

Basics of ordinary differential equation modeling of signal transduction motifs, small circuits of regulatory proteins and genes that serve as building blocks of complex regulatory circuits. Morning session covers numerical modeling experiments. Afternoon session explores theory underpinning that day’s modeling session. Modeling done using Mathematica, which is provided to enrolled students.

Instructor: Ferrell, J.


Chemical and Systems Biology 201: Bootcamp

(Offered 2016-2017 and typically every year: Autumn Quarter : 1 unit)

In this “boot camp” students perform hands-on original research in small groups, combining chemical biology systems-level approaches to investigate current biological problems. This year’s course will investigate the function and regulation of uncharacterized genes. Students will acquire conceptual and methodological training in a wide range of modern techniques, including “omics” approaches, fluorescence microscopy, genome editing, computational approaches, and quantitative data analysis.

Instructors: Jarosz, D. and Teruel, M.


Chemical and Systems Biology 210: Cell Signaling

(Offered 2016-2017 and typically every year : Winter Quarter : 4 units)

The molecular mechanisms through which cells receive and respond to external signals. Emphasis is on principles of cell signaling, the systems-level properties of signal transduction modules, and experimental strategies through which cell signaling pathways are being studied. Prerequisite: working knowledge of biochemistry and genetics.

Instructor: Meyer, T.


Chemical and Systems Biology 220. Chemistry of Biological Processes

(Offered 2016-2017 and alternating years : Spring Quarter : 3 units)

The principles of organic and physical chemistry as applied to biomolecules. The goal is a working knowledge of chemical principles that underlie biological processes, and chemical tools used to study and manipulate biological systems. Current topics may include chemical genetics, activity-based probes, DNA/RNA chemistry and molecular evolution, protein labeling, carbohydrate engineering, fluorescent proteins and sensors, optochemical/optogenetic methods, mass spectrometry, and genome-editing technologies.

Instructor: Wandless, T.


Chemcial and Systems Biology 222. Imaging: Biological Light Microscopy

(Offered 2016-2017 and alternating years : Spring Quarter : 3 units)

Survey of instruments which use light and other radiation for analysis of cells in biological and medical research. Topics: basic light microscopy through confocal fluorescence and video/digital image processing. Lectures on physical principles; involves partial assembly and extensive use of lab instruments. Lab. Prerequisites: some college physics, Biology core.

Instructor: Teruel, M.


Chemical and Systems Biology 240A. A Practical Approach to Drug Discovery and Development

(Offered 2016-2017 and alternating years : Winter Quarter : 3 units)

The scientific principles and technologies involved in making the transition from a basic biological observation to the creation of a new drug emphasizing molecular and genetic issues. Prerequisite: biochemistry, chemistry, or bioengineering.

Instructors: Mochly-Rosen, D. and Grimes, K.


Chemical and Systems Biology 240B. A Practical Approach to Drug Discovery and Development

(Offered 2016-2017 and alternating years : Spring Quarter: 3 units)

(Continuation of CSB 240A) Advancing a drug from discovery of a therapeutic target to human trials and commercialization. Topics include: high throughput assay development, compound screening, lead optimization, protecting intellectual property, toxicology testing, regulatory issues, assessment of clinical need, defining the market, conducting clinical trials, project management, and commercialization issues, including approach to licensing and raising capital. Prerequisite: CSB 240A.

Instructors: Mochly-Rosen, D. and Grimes, K.


Chemical and Systems Biology 242. Drug Discovery and Development Seminar Series

(Offered 2016-2017 and typically every year : Autumn, Spring and Winter Quarters : 1 unit)

The scientific principles and technologies involved in making the transition from a basic biological observation to the creation of a new drug emphasizing molecular and genetic issues. Prerequisite: biochemistry, chemistry, or bioengineering.

Instructors: Grimes, K. and Mochly-Rosen, D.


Chemical and Systems Biology 245. Economics of Biotechnology

(Offered 2016-2017 and typically every year : Spring Quarter : 2 units)

Focuses on translation of promising research discovery into marketed drugs and the integration of scientific method, clinical needs assessment, clinical and regulatory strategy, market analysis, economic considerations, and the influence of the healthcare economic ecosystem necessary for successful translation. Explores the economic perspectives of various stakeholders–patients, providers, payers, biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies, FDA, and financial markets–and how they influence drug development.

Instructors: Chen, L.


Chemical and Systems Biology 250. The Biology of Chromatin-Templated Processes

(Offered 2015-2016 and alternating years : Spring Quarter : 4 units)

Topics include eukaryotic gene activation and silencing; DNA replication, recombination, and repair; mechanisms of checkpoint activation; chromatin structure and modification; epigenetic phenomena in biology; RNA-mediated gene regulatory mechanisms; and nuclear reprogramming.

Instructors: Cimprich, K. and Wysocka, J.


Chemical and Systems Biology 260. Concepts and Applications in Chemical Biology

(Offered 2015-2016 and alternating years : Spring Quarter : 3 units)

Current topics include chemical genetics, activity-based probes, inducible protein degradation, DNA/RNA chemistry and molecular evolution, protein labeling, carbohydrate engineering, fluorescent proteins and sensors, optochemical/optogenetic methods, mass spectrometry, and genome-editing technologies.

Instructor: Chen, J.