CSB

Stanford School of Medicine

Chemical & Systems Biology

 

Courses

The Department of Chemical and Systems Biology offers several graduate courses that span cell biology, chemical biology, systems biology, and drug discovery. Our students also draw on a wide array of courses offered by other departments and programs.

Information about additional courses can be obtained from the Stanford University Bulletin.


Biosciences Interdisciplinary 204: Practical Tutorial on the Modeling of Signal Transduction Motifs

(Offered 2012-2013 : Spring Quarter : 2 units)

Basics of ordinary differential equation modeling of signal transduction motifs, small circuits of regulatory proteins and genes that serve as building blocks of complex regulatory circuits. Morning session covers numerical modeling experiments. Afternoon session explores theory underpinning that day’s modeling session. Modeling done using Mathematica, which is provided to enrolled students.

Instructor: Ferrell, J.


Chemical and Systems Biology 210: Cell Signaling

(Offered 2012-2013 and typically every year : Winter Quarter : 4 units)

The molecular mechanisms through which cells receive and respond to external signals. Emphasis is on principles of cell signaling, the systems-level properties of signal transduction modules, and experimental strategies through which cell signaling pathways are being studied. Prerequisite: working knowledge of biochemistry and genetics.

Instructor: Meyer, T.


Chemical and Systems Biology 220. Chemistry of Biological Processes

(Offered 2012-2013 and alternating years : Spring Quarter : 3 units)

The molecular mechanisms through which cells receive and respond to external signals. The principles of organic and physical chemistry as applied to biomolecules. Goal is a working knowledge of chemical principles that underlie biological processes, and chemical tools used to study and manipulate biological systems. Prerequisites: organic chemistry and biochemistry, or consent of instructor.

Instructor: Wandless, T.


Chemical and Systems Biology 230. Current Methods in Proteomics

(Offered 2012-2013 : 3 units)

Introduces students to the instrumentation, experimental strategies, and computational methods used for identification and quantification of protein concentrations and posttranslational modifications on a systems-wide level. Topics include mass spectrometry (instrumentation configurations; polypeptide ionization; sample preparation and fractionation techniques; mass spectra interpretation; relative and absolute protein quantitation; and proteome-scale dataset analysis), protein and antibody arrays, multiparameter flow cytometry with Bayesian analysis, ribosomal protein translation profiling, and GFP and fluorescence imaging based quantification of protein abundance and post-translational modifications. Students present interpretations of current and classic literature.

Instructors: Elias, J. and Teruel, M.


Chemical and Systems Biology 240A. A Practical Approach to Drug Discovery and Development

(Offered 2012-2013 and alternating years : Winter Quarter : 3 units)

The scientific principles and technologies involved in making the transition from a basic biological observation to the creation of a new drug emphasizing molecular and genetic issues. Prerequisite: biochemistry, chemistry, or bioengineering.

Instructors: Mochly-Rosen, D. and Grimes, K.


Chemical and Systems Biology 240B. A Practical Approach to Drug Discovery and Development

(Offered 2012-2013 and alternating years : Spring Quarter: 3 units)

(Continuation of CSB 240A) Advancing a drug from discovery of a therapeutic target to human trials and commercialization. Topics include: high throughput assay development, compound screening, lead optimization, protecting intellectual property, toxicology testing, regulatory issues, assessment of clinical need, defining the market, conducting clinical trials, project management, and commercialization issues, including approach to licensing and raising capital. Prerequisite: CSB 240A.

Instructors: Mochly-Rosen, D. and Grimes, K.


Chemical and Systems Biology 242. Drug Discovery and Development Seminar Series

(Offered 2012-2013 and typically every year : Spring and Winter Quarters : 1 unit)

The scientific principles and technologies involved in making the transition from a basic biological observation to the creation of a new drug emphasizing molecular and genetic issues. Prerequisite: biochemistry, chemistry, or bioengineering.

Instructors: Grimes, K. and Mochly-Rosen, D.


Chemical and Systems Biology 250. The Biology of Chromatin-Templated Processes

(Offered 2012-2013 and alternating years : Winter Quarter : 4 units)

Topics include eukaryotic gene activation and silencing; DNA replication, recombination, and repair; mechanisms of checkpoint activation; chromatin structure and modification; epigenetic phenomena in biology; RNA-mediated gene regulatory mechanisms; and nuclear reprogramming.

Instructors: Cimprich, K. and Wysocka, J.


Chemical and Systems Biology 260: Concepts and Applications in Chemical Biology

(Offered 2013-2014 and alternating years : Spring Quarter : 4 units)

Topics include chemical genetics, activity-based probes, inducible protein degradation, DNA/RNA chemistry and molecular evolution, protein labeling, carbohydrate engineering, fluorescent proteins and sensors, optochemical/optogenetic methods, mass spectrometry, and genome-editing technologies.

Instructor: Chen, J.


Chemical and Systems Biology 270. Research Seminar

(Offered 2013-2014 and typically every year : Autumn, Winter, and Spring Quarters : 1 unit)

Guest speakers and discussion on current research in cell, chemical, and systems biology.

Instructors: Elias, J. and Teruel, M.


Chemical and Systems Biology 271. Principles of Cell Cycle Control

(Offered 2013-2014 : Fall Quarter : 3 units)

Genetic analysis of the key regulatory circuits governing the control of cell division. Illustration of key principles that can be generalized to other synthetic and natural biological circuits. Focus on tractable model organisms; growth control; irreversible biochemical switches; chromosome duplication; mitosis; DNA damage checkpoints; MAPK pathway-cell cycle interface; oncogenesis. Analysis of classic and current primary literature.

Instructors: Skotheim, J. and Ferrell, J.