Faculty

James K. Chen
Contact Info:

jameschen@stanford.edu
650.725.3582
CCSR Room 3155C

Chen Lab:

650.725.4184
CCSR Room 3150

Administrative Associate:

Cynthia Leyva
cleyva@stanford.edu
650.723.1040
CCSR 3155

James K. Chen, Ph.D.

Professor and Chair

Department of Chemical and Systems Biology

Research Interests:

Developmental signaling pathways and their roles in embryonic patterning and oncogenesis; zebrafish models of tissue patterning and regeneration; synthetic chemistry and chemical biology.

Karlene Cimprich
Contact Info:

cimprich@stanford.edu
650.498.4720
Clark W350

Cimprich Lab:

650.498.5011
Clark W350

Administrative Associate:

Sandrin Kosasih
smarsha@stanford.edu
650.725.4209
Clark W352

Karlene Cimprich, Ph.D.

Professor

Department of Chemical and Systems Biology

Research Interests:

Genome stability pathways and their roles in cancer and other human diseases; DNA damage response pathways and DNA replication; the interface between RNA processing and transcription with genome stability.

Joshua Elias
Contact Info:

josh.elias@stanford.edu
650.724.3422
Clark W300C

Elias Lab:

650.723.6121
Clark W300

Administrative Associate:

Jennie Visitacion
jenniev@stanford.edu
650.724.2971
Clark W2.1

Joshua Elias, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Department of Chemical and Systems Biology

Research Interests:

New mass spectrometry-based experimental and computational tools that advance the field of proteomics; applying them to important diseases including cancer, heart disease and autoimmunity.

James E. Ferrell, Jr.
Contact Info:

james.ferrell@stanford.edu
650.723.8457
CCSR 3155A

Ferrell Lab:

650.725.0793
CCSR 3160

Administrative Associate:

Cynthia Leyva
cleyva@stanford.edu
650.723.1040
CCSR 3155

James E. Ferrell, Jr., M.D., Ph.D.

Professor

Department of Chemical and Systems Biology

Research Interests:

Cell cycle regulation, especially M-phase regulation, in Xenopus embryos and mammalian cell lines; systems biology of signal transduction pathways.

Kevin Grimes
Contact Info:

kgrimes@stanford.edu
650.721.6185
CCSR 3145C

Administrative Associate:

Kathy Johnson
Kathyj1@stanford.edu
650.498.8098
CCSR 3145

Kevin Grimes, M.D.

Associate Professor

Department of Chemical and Systems Biology

Research Interests:

Translation of promising research discoveries into novel therapeutics and diagnostics; discovery and development of new drugs, biologics, and diagnostics; repurposing existing drugs against new targets for new clinical indications; developing novel therapeutics and diagnostics for neglected global health problems; the role of non canonical amino acids in human disease.

Daniel F. Jarosz
Contact Info:

jarosz@stanford.edu
650.723.8457
CCSR 3145B

Jarosz Lab:

650.736.9156
CCSR 3120

Administrative Associate:

Cynthia Leyva
cleyva@stanford.edu
650.723.1040
CCSR 3155

Daniel F. Jarosz, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Department of Chemical and Systems Biology

Research Interests:

Protein conformational switches in evolution, disease, and development; molecular mechanisms driving mutational robustness in pathogens and cancer in complex cellular systems; chemical biology, cell signaling, and quantitative genetics.

Tobias Meyer
Contact Info:

tobias1@stanford.edu
650.724.6692
Clark W200A

Meyer Lab:

650.724.7445
Clark W200

Administrative Associate:

Jennie Visitacion
jenniev@stanford.edu
650.724.2971
Clark W2.1

Tobias Meyer, Ph.D.

Professor

Department of Chemical and Systems Biology

Research Interests:

Ca2+, lipid second messenger and small GTPase signaling pathways; Control of cell polarity, chemotaxis, and collective migration as well as cell proliferation and differentiation decisions.

Daria Mochly-Rosen
Contact Info:

mochly@stanford.edu
650.725.7720
CCSR 3145A

Mochly-Rosen Lab:

650.725.6026
CCSR 3140

Administrative Associate:

Kathy Johnson
kathyj1@stanford.edu
650.724.8098
CCSR 3145

SPARK Program

Daria Mochly-Rosen, Ph.D.

Professor

Department of Chemical and Systems Biology

Research Interests:

Protein kinase C signaling in normal & disease states; mitochondrial function and dynamics in normal & disease states; oxidative stress and aldehydic load; protein-protein interaction; drug discovery.

Stanley Qi
Contact Info:

stanley.qi@stanford.edu
650.498.9986
Shriram Room 329

Qi Lab:

Shriram Room 376

Administrative Associate:

Virginia Diaz
vdiaz1@stanford.edu
650.724.9615
Shriram Room 375

Stanley Qi, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Department of Chemical and Systems Biology

Research Interests:

Tool development for genome engineering; Gene regulatory network of cell fate decisions; Cancer immunotherapy.

Mary Teruel
Contact Info:

mteruel@stanford.edu
650.721.2045
CCSR 3155B

Teruel Lab:

650.721.2868
CCSR 3120

Administrative Associate:

Jennie Visitacion
jenniev@stanford.edu
650.724.2971
CCSR 3155 and Clark Center W2.1

Mary Teruel, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Department of Chemical and Systems Biology

Research Interests:

Uncovering the molecular mechanisms controlling cell differentiation and its critical role in diabetes, obesity, and cancer; understanding how cell signaling and chromatin interact to decide cell fate.

Thomas J. Wandless
Contact Info:

wandless@stanford.edu
650.723.4005
Clark W350A

Wandless Lab:

650.725.6859
Clark W350

Administrative Associate:

Sandrin Kosasih
smarsha@stanford.edu
650.725.4209
Clark W352

Thomas J. Wandless, Ph.D.

Professor

Department of Chemical and Systems Biology

Research Interests:

Cellular mechanisms responsible for protein quality control surveillance and degradation; invention of new technologies to enable biomedical research; synthetic chemistry and chemical biology.

Joanna Wysocka
Contact Info:

wysocka@stanford.edu
650.736.0672
SIM1 Building G3078A

Wysocka Lab:

650.725.6063
SIM1 Building G3065

Administrative Associate:

Sandrin Kosasih
smarsha@stanford.edu
650.725.4209
Clark W352

Joanna Wysocka, Ph.D.

Professor

Department of Chemical and Systems Biology

Research Interests:

Epigenetic regulation of development; cis-regulatory elements; chromatin modification and remodeling; stem cell self-renewal and differentiation; neural crest and formation of the human face.

Carolyn Bertozzi
Contact Info:

bertozzi@stanford.edu
650.721.4781
Keck Room 267

Bertozzi Lab:

650.721.4783
Keck Room 262

Administrative Associate:

Asia Avelino
aavelino@stanford.edu
650.721.4782

Carolyn Bertozzi, Ph.D.

Professor

Department of Chemistry

Research Interests:

Cell surface interactions that contribute to human health and disease with specific projects in the areas of cancer, inflammation and bacterial infection. Use techniques of organic synthesis, genetics, and biochemistry as tools to study and manipulate complex cellular processes. Much of our research involves cell surface oligosaccharides, biopolymers that contribute to cell surface recognition and cell-cell communication.

Matthew Bogyo
Contact Info:

mbogyo@stanford.edu
650.725.4132
Edwards R270

Bogyo Lab:

650.725.6981
Edwards R271

Administrative Associate:

Bryan Odom
bodom@stanford.edu
650.736.0062
CCSR 3255

Matthew Bogyo, Ph.D.

Professor

Department of Pathology

Research Interests:

Proteolytic pathways involved in cancer, inflammation and infectious disease. Use of small molecules to image protease activity, design of protease inhibitors and therapeutic applications.

Markus Covert
Contact Info:

mcovert@stanford.edu
650.725.6615
Shriram Room 15

Covert Lab:

650.498.6272
Shriram Room 62

Administrative Associate:

Kimberly Chin
kimchin@stanford.edu
650.724.1760
Shriram Room 91

Markus Covert, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Department of Bioengineering

Research Interests:

Building computational models of complex biological processes to guide an experimental program and accelerate discovery.

Justin Du Bois, Ph.D.
Contact Info:

jdubois@stanford.edu
650.724.4557
Lokey Chemistry Room L234

Du Bois Lab:

650.724.4558
Lokey Chemistry Room 237

Administrative Associate:

Flora Truong
ftruong@stanford.edu
650.724.7306
Mudd 185

Justin Du Bois, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Department of Chemistry

Research Interests:

Voltage-gated ion channel trafficking and regulation; influence of glial cells on channel expression; molecular design, chemical synthesis, and homology modeling; electrophysiology and imaging.

Brian Kobilka, M.D.
Contact Info:

kobilka@stanford.edu
650.723.7069
Beckman 157

Kobilka Lab:

650.723.7069
Beckman 159, 161

Brian Kobilka, M.D.

Professor

Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

Research Interests:

Structural basis of G protein-coupled receptor signal transduction.

Michael Z. Lin
Contact Info:

mzlin@stanford.edu
650.721.1681
CCSR 2115

Lin Lab:

650.723.2874
CCSR 2110

Administrative Associate:

Pardip Kaur Chahal
pchahal@stanford.edu
650.721.1173
CCSR 2115

Michael Z. Lin, M.D., Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Departments of Neurobiology and Bioengineering

Research Interests:

Protein engineering applied to sensing or controlling cell biology, including fluorescent proteins, optogenetic actuators, synthetic signaling nodes, and drug-controlled production switches.

Beverly Mitchell, M.D.
Contact Info:

bmitchell@stanford.edu
650.725.9621
Lokey Stem Cell G2167

Administrative Associate:

Leigh Wang
lzwang@stanford.edu
650.736.7716
Lokey Stem Cell G2167

Beverly Mitchell, M.D.

Professor

Department of Medicine

Research Interests:

Hematopoiesis, trafficking of nucleolar proteins, regulation of ribosomal RNA synthesis, autophagy, leukemogenesis, development of novel therapeutics for leukemias.

Jan M. Skotheim
Contact Info:

skotheim@stanford.edu
650.721.1160
Lokey Chemistry Room 137

Skotheim Lab:

650.721.6401
Lokey Chemistry Room 149

Administrative Associate:

Lisa Pereira
lpereira@stanford.edu
650.723.0419
Lokey Chemistry Room 144

Jan M. Skotheim, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Department of Biology

Research Interests:

Cell cycle control, maternal to zygotic transition, cell size control, MAPK signaling, systems and quantitative biology.

Aaron F. Straight
Contact Info:

astraigh@stanford.edu
650.723.2941
Beckman 409A

Straight Lab:

650.723.7718
Beckman 409

Aaron F. Straight, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Department of Biochemistry

Research Interests:

Chromosome segregation, chromosome structure, centromeres and kinetochores, chromatin dynamics and remodeling, noncoding RNA, cell division, zygotic genome activation, microscopy.

Paul Wender
Contact Info:

wenderp@stanford.edu
650.723.0208
Lokey Chemistry Room 206

Wender Lab:

650.723.3898
Lokey Chemistry Room 207-216

Administrative Associate:

Kathi Robbins
krobbins@stanford.edu
650.723.1359
Lokey Chemistry Room 204

Paul Wender, Ph.D.

Professor

Department of Chemistry

Research Interests:

Chemical biology, synthesis, computer-based drug design, drug delivery, medicinal chemistry, imaging, HIV/AIDS eradication, cancer immunotherapy, Alzheimer’s disease.

Marius Wernig, M.D., Ph.D.
Contact Info:

wernig@stanford.edu
650.721.2495
SIM1 Building G3141

Wernig Lab:

650.721.2495
SIM1 Building G3145

Administrative Associate:

Hale Ozemek
haleo@stanford.edu
650.725.9892
SIM1 Building G3141

Marius Wernig, M.D., Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Department of Pathology

Research Interests:

Direct lineage reprogramming into neural cell types; Pluripotent stem cells; Human models of disease and gene function; Molecular mechanisms and clinical applications of reprogramming techniques.

Leon Chen, Ph.D.

Adjunct Professor

Department of Chemical and Systems Biology

Leon Chen, Ph.D., is a Venture Partner with OrbiMed. Prior to joining OrbiMed, Dr. Chen was the co-founder of KAI Pharmaceuticals where he built the company as the first employee. He held responsibilities research, intellectual property and business development before Amgen acquired KAI in 2012. He was previously an Entrepreneur in Residence at Venrock and most recently was a Partner at Skyline Ventures where he served on the board of a number of biotech and diagnostic companies. Dr. Chen has a B.A. in Biochemistry from U.C. Berkeley, a Ph.D in Molecular Pharmacology from Stanford and an M.B.A from the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

Rami Hannoush, Ph.D.

Adjunct Professor

Department of Chemical and Systems Biology

Rami Hannoush, Ph.D., joined the Early Discovery Biochemistry department at Genentech in 2006 after completing his postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard and his Ph.D. degree at McGill University. His current role includes leading interdisciplinary teams in lead discovery and research biology, with the overarching goal of developing therapeutics for the treatment of diseases with unmet medical need. He has a deep and broad interest in science and translational research, and Genentech offers him a unique opportunity to conduct ground-breaking science and at the same time translate our discoveries into the clinic.

Steven Schow, Ph.D.

Adjunct Professor

Department of Chemical and Systems Biology

Steven R. Schow, Ph.D. has been a SPARK advisor for the past 8 years. He served as Vice President, Research since March 2000 at Telik and as Senior Director of Medicinal Chemistry from March 1998 until March 2000. Prior to joining Telik, Dr. Schow served as a Director of Medicinal Chemistry at CV Therapeutics, Inc., a biotechnology company, from May 1995 to March 1998. He served as a Senior Group Leader at Lederle Laboratories, a division of American Cyanamid, from November 1991 until May 1995. Dr. Schow was a post-doctoral fellow in organic chemistry at the University of California at Los Angeles and the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Schow holds a Ph.D. degree in organic chemistry from the University of California at San Diego and a B.S. degree in chemistry from California State University, Los Angeles.

Stuart Kim
Contact Info:

stuartkm@stanford.edu
650-867-3189
Beckman 346

Stuart Kim, Ph.D.

Professor Emeritus

Department of Developmental Biology

Dr. Stuart K. Kim, Ph.D. is a Professor Emeritus in the Department of Developmental Biology at Stanford University. Dr. Kim has been a Markey Scholar, a Searle Scholar and an Ellison Scholar for his research on the genetics of aging. He is an Editor of PLOS Genetics, on the National Science Advisory Council for the American Federation for Aging Research and the Scientific Advisory Board for the Buck Institute for Age Research. He has produced DNA microarrays for C. elegans and used them to profile gene expression during development and aging. Before working on functional genomics, he worked on cell polarity in epithelial cells and Ras signaling in C. elegans. Dr. Kim served as Member of Anti-aging Scientific Advisory Board at Nu Skin Enterprises Inc., since January 2010. Dr. Kim received bachelors’ degrees in chemistry and philosophy from Dartmouth College in 1979. He then moved to biology at Caltech and received a doctorate in 1984. He spent five years as a post-doctoral fellow at MIT.

Richard Roth, Ph.D.

Professor Emeritus

Department of Chemical and Systems Biology

Insulin is one of the primary regulators of rapid anabolic responses in the body. Defects in the synthesis and/or ability of cells to respond to insulin results in the condition known as diabetes mellitus. To better design methods of treatment for this disorder, Richard Roth’s research was focused on how insulin elicits its various biological responses.

James Whitlock, M.D.

Professor Emeritus

Department of Molecular Pharmacology

James Whitlock’s research consisted of analyzing the mechanism by which the environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, dioxin) induces gene transcription. TCDD binds to an intracellular protein (the Ah receptor) which then dimerizes with a second bHLH/PAS protein (Arnt) to form a heterodimeric, DNA binding transcription factor. The AhR/Arnt complex interacts with a dioxin-responsive transcriptional enhancer located upstream of the target CYP1A1 gene. The receptor-enhancer interaction disrupts the nucleosomal structure of the regulatory region, increasing the access of the transcription factors to the CYP1A1 promoter in vivo.